don’t-worry-be-happy mother’s day

by vanessagobes

It was spring and I was walking under the pink magnolia blossoms lining Commonwealth Ave in Boston, on my way to a prenatal yoga class.  After a long struggle with morning sickness and lethargy, I was starting to feel energized again and was exploring ways to stay in shape while carrying.  Yoga sounded like a safe bet so I trotted off to my first class.

I was five months along, just starting to develop a visible roundness to my belly, finally wearing real maternity clothes and beginning to think of this baby as more than just the impetus for nausea and a stuffy nose.

There was a teensy person in there, growing fast.  I’d just found out she was a girl and obsessively tried on baby names.  I can’t be sure, but I can imagine myself mentally combing through “The Best 1,000 Baby Names of 2004” when my clog caught a mislaid brick and I face-planted right there on the sidewalk – well, more like belly-planted.  I landed tummy first, arms reaching awkwardly forward and legs stretching behind me.  I didn’t move.

A man in a business suit hustled over to help me find my feet and I stood there for a few moments, examining my scraped, bloodied palms, brushing sand off my protruding belly.  I told the good samaritan I was okay and hobbled off to yoga, sniffling and deflated.

The scene, in general, was nothing overly memorable.  The pain was minimal, the spring day was ordinary, the clumsiness was nothing I hadn’t experienced before.  But this stumble laid the first foundational stone in what would become a motherhood filled with worry.

During the weeks following my fall, I had convinced myself that I’d caused my baby harm.  I would lie in bed at night with my palms splayed out on my belly, begging Baby Girl Gobes for a kick or a hiccup or an arcing elbow to confirm that she was still alive.

I called my OB, “But I fell FLAT on my belly, doc… all of my weight… must have crushed her.  Should I come in for an ultrasound or something?  Anything?”  My doctor assured me the baby was fine.

Pregnancy progressed normally but I still found other things to worry about:  smoke rising from manhole covers, cabin pressure on a trans-Atlantic flight, chlorinated pools, bumpy car rides and arguments with my husband.  All of these ordinary things seemed to pose a danger to my unborn child and I began to stockpile an armory of “what ifs”.

As I neared week 40, I committed myself to natural childbirth.  I worked with a doula, an extraordinary woman who assured me that both the baby and me would be better off for a drug-free experience.

No drugs.  No way out.  Well, one way out – between my legs.  Holy shit.

I liken the feeling to preparing for a date with the firing squad.  The sentence has been decided, it’s scary, people are watching, it’s going to hurt like hell and the aftermath is a complete and utter mystery.

As it turned out, all those things were true.  But instead of a blindfold and a lit cigarette, I was equipped with an IV and ice chips.

After several hours of contractions and pushing, my baby girl was placed gently on my chest and I briefly bawled my eyes out.  I didn’t die after all.  Instead heaven came to me.  And with heaven, as is expected in motherhood, came even more worry.

Am I doing this right?  Am I permanently scarring my child?  Am I a crappy Mom?  Is my kid going to hate me for all of the mistakes I’m making?  We all ask these things, right?  Unfortunately, the answers to these questions validate all of our parental concerns.

Because we aren’t doing it right.  No one does.  We are totally scarring our children.  That’s what parents do.  Every parent wears the Crap Crown sometimes.  And yes, our kids will hate us at some point – we’ll just have to hope it’s short-lived and based in irrational, hormonal, misplaced illogic.

But unlike the pain of childbirth, there is a way out of our looming motherly fears – acceptance.  When we accept these inevitabilities, something really amazing happens.  That tight grip we have on the worry and concern and anxiety, nestled so conveniently into parenthood, loosens.  The worry evaporates.

We accept that there’s only so much we as mothers can do.  We can guide them.  We can educate them.  We can encourage them.  But we can’t live life for them.  They are who they are.

They’re going to fail classes, get sick, lose games, offend adults, break arms, lose expensive electronics, crash cars and make fools of themselves, just like we did.  That will change when they are adults.  Or it won’t.

Some will overachieve early then burn out – or maybe continue to overachieve and stress out.  Some will fly below the radar then launch into the stratosphere of success later in life.  And some will be total screw-ups for the duration of the ride.  And all of that is okay.

There are important lessons to be learned regardless of the path, each as valuable as the other.  In fact, the drug-addict / drop-out / derelict probably learns more about life than the magna cum laude MIT grad groomed by his parents for high achievement.  Life without life-learning is no life at all.

But enough about them, let’s get back to us.  The Mommies.  Because we’re the ones connecting here.  We’re exploring our own feelings associated with worrying about our kids (who probably aren’t worrying about themselves at all).

Our worry is like tumbleweed, picking up all sorts of garbage as the winds of life roll it along.  Garbage that doesn’t help us one bit.  If we Moms allow the tumbleweed to entangle us, we’ll only end up with deep wrinkles, sleepless nights and multiple prescriptions for Xanax.

But worry and acceptance cannot exist in the same space.  It’s impossible.  And there are beautiful side effects of acceptance: liberation, trust and peace.

Wouldn’t it be nice to take a break from the obsession?  From the projection?  From the competition?  From the fear?  From all of those ugly tendencies that we’ve been carrying around since scraping our bellies off the sidewalk in week 20 of pregnancy?

Dragging around a garbage bag of fear will only encourage those same feelings in our children.  That black Hefty is only so thick.  And our trashy bits end up ripping the liner, leaking out and causing a big stink for the people around us.  People like the kids we’re worrying so much about.  Sure, we can tell them not to worry.  But our kiddos do as we do, right?  So let’s do something helpful – model acceptance and collaboration.

Easier said than done, I know.  But acknowledging fear and the reasons for fear is a beautiful stimulus for change, creating wide crack for light to shine in and expose fear for what it is:  Useless.

Meditation is a great way to drag those useless habits out to the magnolia-lined curb.

Often when I meditate lately, I hear the words “create space”.  (I’d love to know who is saying that to me, by the way.)  For me, the creation of space is a deliberate effort to push all of life’s clutter off to the sides and invite an open connection between me and the universe.  In that open space, I can find acceptance.  Anyone can do this.  You don’t need to take a class or read a book or have a special degree to do it.  You just have to know how to breathe.

Solutions don’t have to be complicated or even external.  Peace is as close as your breath.

I’m so grateful for this mindfulness practice.  Through non-doing, I’m actually doing the best thing I could do for myself and my family.  There will be times ahead during which my trust in the universe will be tested, I’m sure.  Nights when I’m wearing a trench in my hardwood floors from pacing.  Days when my kids are flailing and I’m desperate to carry their pain the way I carried their little bodies so long ago.  But the more I practice acceptance, the easier I’ll recover from those angst-ridden moments.   Mindfulness is a lifelong practice that deepens with time.  And as far as I can tell, time is all we’ve got.

Have a happy Sunday, Mommies.

From mine to yours,

Vanessa

ps

I am ever-so-grateful to those who share, tweet, like and/or promote my writing in any way.  I’m a stay-at-home mom trying to rub two sticks together and spark a career.  Matches welcome.  🙂

Image

this is my favorite personal pic. holding my first baby moments after birth. my face full of unanswerable questions.