bringingupbuddhas

suburban adventures in bu-curious mothering

Tag: buddhism for kids

bu-review for kids: the great gilly hopkins by katherine paterson

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I picked up The Great Gilly Hopkins last week at the library because it was recommended by Girl Scouts of America as a good read for Brownie scouts.  I did not expect this fiction novel by Katherine Paterson to offer up a great lesson in compassion for my BUBs.  (I also did not expect to be crying my eyes out over a book written for 10-year-olds, but that happened, too.)

Gilly is an angry 11-year-old who’s been shuffled from foster home to foster home since she was a baby.  She is guarded, sassy, manipulative, proud, prejudiced and destructive.  But under all of that difficulty is a little girl who desperately wants to belong and be loved.  The characters are fantastic, the plot is simple yet powerful.

The language is a little mature for my kids – ages 4,6,8 – but I read aloud and substituted darn for damn and heck for hell.  There was also a point when I had to stop reading the book altogether and offer an in-depth history lesson on racism in America.  (Gilly’s racist mindset is challenged by two black characters, her neighbor and her teacher, who are likely the most well-educated characters she meets.)

I found that my youngest child slipped in and out of attention – and the room – occasionally asking me why Gilly doesn’t live with her mother.  He was obviously disturbed by my description of the foster care system, hence the repetitive questioning.  My middle daughter was also disengaged.  She fell asleep twice while I was reading.  Other nights she ignored Great Gilly altogether and buried her face in Pokemon comics or math workbooks.  But Gilly provided an extraordinary lesson in compassion for my 8-year-old and me… tandem paradigm shifts.

If you are looking for a Buddhist or bu-curious lesson to teach your kids, ask them to point out moments when folks in the story practice compassion, forgiveness and/or acceptance.  It is also a wonderful opportunity to talk about deeper Buddhist ideas, too – basic karmic law, or cause and effect, and Buddhahood, that beautiful shining gem that exists in each one of us, just waiting to be polished.

Here are some great times to stop the story and discuss the above mentioned ideas:

  • the way Trotter consistently interacts with a grizzly-behaved Gilly
  • the assumptions Gilly makes about Trotter based on her physical description
  • how Mr. Randolph responds to Gilly after discovering her indiscretion
  • Ms. Harris’ reaction to Gilly’s card
  • the point Gilly decides William Earnest is her brother
  • the way Gilly took care of everyone over Thanksgiving

I’d also suggest stopping any time you see your child crying and asking him or her how they are feeling and what they are thinking.  In retrospect, I wish I’d done this more, because PG and I spent a lot of time whimpering and blowing our noses through the last third of the book.

Here’s a list of questions that would be great to ask after reading the book:

  1. When do you think Gilly realized she loved Trotter, W.E. and Mr. Randolph?
  2. Why do you think Gilly wrote letters to W.E. filled with lies and false stories?
  3. Do you think it was very hard for Ms. Harris to stay composed when Gilly gave her that terrible card?  Do you think you could have done that?  Why is it important to stay composed?
  4. Was Gilly a bad kid?  Why or why not?
  5. Was Trotter a good Mom?  Why or why not?
  6. Have you ever thought bad things about somebody because of the way they look, like Gilly did?
  7. What do you think is the meaning of Mr. Randolph’s favorite poem?  (Go through it with them line by line.  When they’re done, tell them what you think it means.)
  8. Why and how do you think people were able to forgive Gilly, even when she behaved so badly?
  9. What do you think Gilly learned from living at Trotter’s?  Could you see her applying her lessons in Jackson, Virginia?  Will Gilly be OK without her Courtney?

Last thing to share, Mr. Randolph’s favorite poem, written by William Wordsworth, which sings to my spirit:

“There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream,

The earth, and every common sight,

To me did seem

Apparell’d in celestial light,

The glory and the freshness of a dream.

It is not now as it hath been of yore: —

Turn wheresoever I may,

By night or day,

The things which I have seen I know can see no more.

Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting:

The Soul that rises with us, our life’s Star,

Hath had elsewhere its setting,

And cometh from afar:

Not in entire forgetfulness,

And not in utter nakedness,

But trailing clouds of glory do we come

From God, who is our home.

Thanks to the human heart by which we live,

Thanks to its tenderness, its joys, and fears,

To me the meanest flower that blows can give

Thoughts that do often lie to deep for tears.”

Love it.

From mine to yours,

Vanessa

a new contender in the race for the oval office?

barak?

mitt?

who do you like?

my social views are very liberal, so i lean democrat.  but if a quality moderate republican comes along i’ll swing my vote in the other direction.

my greatest concern has always been social policy.  don’t take our rights away, that’s all i ask.  live free or die, baby.  the issue closest to my heart is gay rights, which should be re-termed “human rights”, because love is a basic human right.  who we love and how we display commitment has absolutely nothing to do with government, federal or state.  my quick story today is spun from this idea.

when we were kids, my sisters and i played house a lot.  one girl would be the mommy, one girl would be the baby and one girl would get stuck being the daddy.  you might as well tell that poor girl to go clean out the garage while the others play.  for a girl, being the daddy sucked.  so every time my daughters play house with their friends, they inevitably start squabbling, “not fair!  i want to be the mommy!”  and inevitably, my girls realize, “it’s okay.  girls can marry each other.  let’s both be mommies.  yay!”

it’s such a simple act of imagination.  but it’s also a beautiful act of acceptance.  kids today provide me with an extraordinary feeling of hope for our future and pride in this generation of parents who are rearing children to be open and accepting of others as they have been created.

with this in mind, i see clearly that the man in the oval office may wield power over current domestic  policy, but the future of this country lies in the hands of a new generation.  the tides are changing, people.  the emerging generation is aware.  they are awake.  they are becoming mindful.  they are innovative.  they are compassionate and sensitive.  they are already changing the world.  and i have nothing but faith and confidence in these children.

this morning while i was making chocolate chip pancakes, my son XG, my 3 year old son, *3 YEAR OLD SON* said out of the blue, “mamma, did you know giwls can mawwy giwls?”  my husband MG and i looked at each other then looked back at him.

“that’s right, buddy,” said MG, waiting patiently to see where the conversation would go.

after a minute i said, “you are very smart, little man.”

“yup,” he said.  “boys can mawwy boys, too.  and batman defeats spidewman.”

well, that decides it.  XG gets my vote this november.  oh, and he gets an A+ on his acceptance and compassion lesson this week in buddha school.

from mine to yours,
vanessa
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children’s lesson: breathing room

I’m reading a TERRIFIC book by Thich Nhat Hanh and the Plum Village Community called Planting Seeds, Practicing Mindfulness with Children.  It’s a compilation of teaching moments and mindfulness lessons that are suited for anyone dealing with children.

This is a book that every teacher or parent should read, though if you are new to meditation I’d recommend reading a book like Goldie Hawn’s 10 Mindful Minutes first to familiarize yourself with the science behind meditation and the benefits associated with a regular practice.  Those who are “in the know” can jump right in and get to work.  The lessons are easy and practical.

There were so many stand-out lessons for me in this book, so I decided to choose a few from the first half of the text and experiment with them on my children.  When the kiddos woke up this morning, I told them we were going to be having a “Lazy Sunday”.   Daddy was golfing so it was just us.  I kept the day a bit of a mystery but offered a few teasers to get them eager to participate.

  • After breakfast, we got dressed and prepared for our first Pebble Meditation by collecting four stones each.  I told them they could go outside and find stones in the garden or they could raid the tumbled crystal collection in my bedroom.  Of course they went straight for my stash.
  • Next we visited my sewing station.  We each selected a bit of fabric so that we could stitch up our own tiny pebble bags.
  • After that, we reinvented our sleeping porch by turning it into our very own Breathing Room.  (Sorry, CG, you lost your room again, but we’ll find you a worthy alternative. 😉 )  A Breathing Room is a space devoted to devotion.  If you don’t have a separate room available, just create a quiet corner in your classroom or living space.  We carried my altar into the room and talked about its adornments.  A Buddha statue, a bell and a vase of fresh flowers.  The Buddha reminds us that the Buddha lives inside us, a bell will help us engage in mindful breathing each time it’s invited and the vase of flowers remind us that we are alive and fresh.  We then scattered some cushions and rugs around the floor and stepped back to admire our work.
  • Then I showed them how to bow when we enter the room, creating a separation between the chaos of the house and the calmness of the Breathing Room.  We also talked about taking the time to bow to the great energy that exists within us, the Buddha within.  We tried some different ways of bowing – bending at the waist, prostrating our bodies to the ground, taking child’s pose.
  • When we settled onto our cushions, we sat criss-cross apple sauce, stretching our backs long and keeping our heads high.
  • The first thing we did was talk about the bell.  Every time the bell is invited, we stop whatever we’re doing and take 3 cleansing breaths.  I taught the kids to fist “wake up the bell” by tapping it lightly with the stick,wait a second, then “invite the bell” by striking it confidently one time so we could all listen to its sound and think about our breath.
  • We spoke about breath.  We felt the rise and fall of our bellies for 10 breaths, just paying attention to the changes in our bodies.  We held our fingers under our nostrils and took 10 breaths, noticing the temperature and humidity changes in the air we took in and out.  How does that happen?  Why is it warm?  What does breath do?  Where does it go?
  • When I felt the kids understood the calming effects of focusing on breath, we moved onto the Pebble Meditation.  You can download a worksheet created by the nuns and monks at Plum Village here if you’d like.  My kids are very young so I created a custom version of the meditation that gave them a little wiggle room.  Here is what we did:
  1. Lay out plain paper, folded in quarters, and a box of crayons.  Ask them to pick out a pebble from their bag and lay it to the left of the paper.  In the first box, ask the kids to color a picture of a flower.  While they color, talk about flowers.  How they grow, how the smell, how we feel when we see them.  Reference the book here, Thich Nhat Hanh provides a beautiful script for us.  When the kids are done coloring, they’ll want to talk about their work.  When they’re ready, ask them to hold their pebbles and sit up straight and tall.   They can examine the pebble, rub it, squeeze it while they sit.  Share the gatha, “Breathing in, I see myself as a flower.  Breathing out, I feel fresh.  Flower, fresh.”  Ask them to repeat the words.  Then one child invites the bell (they love that bell) and we breath in and out three times together, imagining ourselves as flowers.  In, flower.  Out, fresh.  In, flower.  Out, fresh.  In, flower.  Out, fresh.  Then put the pebbles in their little homemade pouches and move onto the next picture.
  2. Reach for the next pebble and place it to the left of the picture.  In the next box, ask them to draw a mountain.  Again, refer to the book for just the right words.  But ask them what they think lies in the center of a mountain.  Is it loud?  Is it busy?  Is there life?  What happens to the inside of the mountain when it snows or when the wind blows?  Does it change with the conditions? (See where we’re going here?)  Pick up the pebble.  Share the gatha, “Breathing in, I see myself as a mountain.  Breathing out, I feel solid.  Mountain, solid.”  Then invite the bell and follow the same routine, substituting flower/fresh for mountain/solid.
  3. Place the another pebble next to the paper.  In the next box, invite them to draw a placid lake.  Read Thay’s words from Planting Seeds, then provide them with any extra interpretation that they might need, as this one is a bit loftier than the others.  Pick up the pebble.  Share the gatha, “Breathing in, I see myself as still water.  Breathing out, I reflect things as they truly are.  Water, reflecting.”  Then finish this portion in the same manner as the others, closing by moving the pebble into the pouch.
  4. Rest the final pebble next to the picture and encourage the children to fill the last box with a picture of space.  They might need some direction drawing space or even understanding what it is.  I chose to point out the space that separated the four of us sitting in the room, but even while it separated us, we were still very much together.  Everyone drew something different, my oldest left the box blank.  All of it’s okay.  Take this time to share Thay’s words then pick up the last pebble.  Share the gatha.  ” Breathing in, I see myself as space.  Breathing out, I am free.  Space, free.”  Take you breaths after inviting the bell then finish up that segment of the meditation.

  • When you finish the Pebble Meditation, take a few minutes to ask the children how each portion made them feel.  Ask if they were able to take three breaths without getting distracted.  Ask how they felt when they pictured themselves as a mountain.  Did they feel strong?  Can they remember that feeling next time they are scared or worried?
  • We ended our practice by bowing to each other with hands at heart center and saying, “Namaste,” or, the sacred light in me bows to the sacred light in you.

After this, we continued on with our Lazy Sunday by taking a walk downtown.  We had lunch on the town green then treated ourselves to a froyo at Swizzles.  Even Rufus was rewarded with a cool treat.

We then bought some poster board so we could create our very own Pebble Meditation poster  to hang in the Breathing Room.  But before heading back, we spent a little more time in the park to play.  We did a walking meditation that is suggested in Planting Seeds.  We started walking in circles around a raised bed flower garden in the center of the garden.  With each step, thought about how our feet felt each time they connected with the bricks.  We moved in slow motion.  As slow as we could.  Then we walked super fast.  Then we pretended we were walking through as swamp.  Then we were business men late for a meeting.  Then we were bunnies then moonwalkers then tightrope performers then superheroes.  This went on for five minutes or so.  And we all had a ball.

Once we got home, I suggested we work on the poster but the kids were done being BUBs and preferred to pull out blankets and sheets to built a fort.  It wasn’t long before they started screaming bloody murder and bludgeoning each other with their stuffed animals.  Ah well.  Rome wasn’t built in a day.

From mine to yours,

Vanessa

bu-curious word of the day: sangha

Sangha:  Pronounced “san-gah”.  This is a community of people practicing Buddhism together.

We very much need to share the path with others.  I’m still searching for my Sangha, though being a Mommy, I have a little head start.  This is a picture of the current (captive) members of my Sangha:

They’re a good crew of little Buddhas, tough to wrangle sometimes, but they have a lot of potential.

From mine to yours,

Vanessa

temple tour: boston ‘burbs & beyond

Aside from the occasional Jew, or more likely half-Jew, you could consider most of New England downright religiously homogenous.  Unless lucky enough to belong to a diverse group of friends, in order to experience any other religious or cultural traditions, one would have to consciously seek out opportunities.  Put it this way, until this summer, Madame Tussaud’s was the closest I’d ever gotten to a Buddhist monk.  And here I am a budding Buddhist.

And it is here in homogenous white bread suburban Boston where I begin my search for a Buddhist community.  Oy vey.

For the past months, I’ve been interviewing monks and nuns, visiting temples and Zendos, trying to find a good fit for my family and me.  There are challenges involved, but I’m feeling confident that I’ll find a match…  pretty much.

First challenge:  geography.

It’s hard to find a family-friendly Buddhist center in the ‘burbs.  I have tracked down a Korean Zen center in the People’s Republic of Cambridge (surprise, surprise, what can’t one find in Cambridge), but the commute on Mass Ave is a friggin bear, even at 7am on Sunday morning.  There is a Japanese Zen center in Brookline, which would be a total pain in the ass to get to from metro north.  There’s actually a very conveniently located Buddhist temple in Lexington but Mandarin is mandatory in order to join, so screw that.  A Tibetan center is down the street in Arlington, on the near side of Mass Ave for me, a place which I’ll expand upon later in this post.  And Worcester boasts a Buddhist center… way out in Worcester…  west…  really west…  ummmmm…  yah, no.  Besides those mentioned, we have a few yoga studios that offer occasional guided medies and Buddha-y yoga sessions, but as far as I know, no lamas or masters on site.  So I’m hoping I’ll find a home with one of these temples and feel an energy match to one of these strands of Buddhism.

Second challenge: scheduling.

Temples are not like churches where the majority of worshippers gather on Sunday mornings and, for the most part, disappear for the rest of the week.  Buddhist centers offer daily meditation hours and dharma talks for adults.  (No kids, please.)  Sessions are typically offered in the evening, witching hours to be exact.  Not ideal for house frau with tiny faces to feed, scrub and send to bed.  But even thought it’s not ideal, I’m happy to make it happen.  I make time to do plenty of other things, and I will just need to tweak my schedie to work in this commitment – for me, the utmost commitment.

Third challenge:  language.

Part of Buddhist practice is chanting.  Depending on which style of Buddhism one choses, the chants can be in Japanese or Mandarin or Indian or Chinese…  pretty much any Asian language.  So when I am chanting, I am chanting in a language that sounds, to me, like this:  as;dfja@*isejfa#liaj sdfjasdiv!$mafjiodcfjds klc&^#mlskdan(vfa.  But that’s only a moderate setback, after all, like Woody Hochswender says in his book The Buddha in Your Mirror, “We do not need to know how an automobile works in order to use it to get somewhere.”  So I chant and I receive, knowing that the Universe understands everything, even if I don’t.

Challenges in mind, I set out on my mission to find a Buddhist center that will be a nice fit for my family.

The first center I visited isn’t actually a temple.  Cambridge Insight Meditation Center is just that – a meditation center, not to far from Harvard Square.  They practice Vinyasa meditation, which is rooted in stillness.  You got an itch?  Fuh-gettaboutit.  You can scratch that bad boy after the bell.  No, really, they’re not that strict at CIMC.  It’s actually a great place to meditate.  I visited a few times and enjoyed every experience.  The meditation room is simple and clean, located on the top floor of an old house.  A  trained teacher offers insight on one topic or another then guides the group through walking and sitting meditations.  Afterwards s/he takes questions.  The room has a beautiful energy and the experience is wonderful.  But it is not the complete temple experience that I’m seeking.

The second center I visited was the geographically desirable one in Arlington.  Drikung Meditation Center, just off Mass Ave near the library, is funky and warm feeling.  The practice is a Tibetan strand of Buddhism, the same dharma practiced by fan-favorite His Holiness The Dalai Lama.  On the day of my visit early this summer, I joined their practitioners on a peace walk.  During this walk, participants carried Buddhist scrolls to spread peaceful energy and bless the sick and suffering.  I was a late arrival so I wasn’t able to grab a scroll, but I yielded with the group and started chatting up a nun with a loosely shaved head and flowing crimson robe.   I’d tell you her name but I can’t remember it – I think it was something she made up when she became a nun.  I must have asked her a hundred questions, the first of which was, “Are we supposed to be quiet during this walk?”  Thankfully, the answer was no.

So I told her briefly about my homespun mini-Bu practice and she told me at length all of the things that I can still do while being a Buddhist.  The two most important of which were 1) eat meat, and 2) let my kids celebrate Christmas.  She actually giggled at the second question and said, “Who doesn’t love Buddha Claus?”  Very cute.  The stickiest thing that she shared with me is that Buddhism is a practice that can be layered on top of every other spiritual experience that I have had.  The journey is about me.  So there’s plenty of wiggle room while I explore.

Once we arrived at the center, it was very…  ummm…  homey.  It’s set up in a house, I don’t know whose, but someone must live there because just beyond the reception room there was a twin bed with rumpled sheets which had obviously been slept in the night before.  On the left as I entered I saw a gift shop slash Dalai Lama shrine.  The overall feeling of this small room was orange.  And rainbow.  And sparkly.  And Lama-y.  There were framed photographs of other lamas, too, but I didn’t know who they were.

Once I got past my initial assessment of the space, I took a few steps in where the resident lama (lama means teacher of dharma), was sprinkling blessed water into people’s hands.  I cupped my hand for my dose of holy water and searched out my nun buddy’s eyes for direction.  She discreetly told me that I should sip a little then pat my crown with my wet hand.  Unfortunately, by the time I received the instruction, there was only a little sweat left on my palm to drink (it was a hot day, ok?) so I licked my hand and patted my head with a grateful smile.

Another super friendly Buddha lady, whom I’d met on the road, invited me to join her in the library where food was being served: Ruffles (with ridges), bagels and some rainbow-colored wet-looking things.  The room was quiet and small.  The people standing around were physically very diverse.  Lots of different languages being spoken in hushed voices.  I stayed and pummeled the friendly Buddha lady with questions for a few minutes, mostly about what I do with my kids while we discuss dharma.  The answer wasn’t what I wanted to hear:  “Oh, they can color in the library, I guess, but we’re not really set up for kids.”  Eek.  I finally decided it was time to make an incredibly awkward exit.  “Wait, have something to eat before you go,” the friendly Buddha lady said.  I pinched a ridged chip and excused myself, weaving my way out of the temple, holding the chip between my index finger and thumb, professing my thanks to everyone I passed with a little lift of my Ruffle and bow of my head.

I left thinking, What the hell am I doing????

The next place I visited is a Zendo in White River Junction, Vermont.  Close to our family’s mountain retreat, I figured I might as well try a taste of Vermont’s Buddhist menu while I was vacationing up north this summer.  I made an appointment with a nice Zen teacher (almost master, long story) named Allyn at a Japanese Zendo situated in a basement office space beside the White River.  I arrived with my 3 year old son XG (the realities of motherhood), and was greeted with a warm handshake and welcoming smile.  Allyn was barefoot, dressed in a simple black robe.  This guy has the a great face.  Tightly cropped hair with bushy bushy eyebrows and deep, bright eyes.  His energy was that of chilllllllllllllll.  So we entered this space, a room equipped with two long benches topped with black cushions and a simple altar at center.  We settled in opposite each other while XG got cozy with a messy tube of strawberry yogurt on a pristine purple floor pillow.  Allyn’s fuzzy brows lifted high and he quickly wedged a napkin between XG and the pillow.   Did I mention how grateful I was that Allyn is so chillllllllllllllll?

We sat and talked for 90 minutes, discussing basics of Zen and some deeper ideas, too.  I asked a gazillion questions:  “When we walked into the Zendo, you bowed.  Who did you bow to?  [No one, really.]  How do you enter the space?  [Straight lines and right angles.]  How do you sit on these benches?  [Cross-legged, knees rooted toward the earth, neck long, crown to sky, hands on lap, palms up, gaze down.]  Where are the chanting books?  [Under the pillows.]  How do I drink Japanese tea?  [It’s complicated.  Better teach you that next time.]   To become Buddhist, do I have to be invited?  Do I go through a baptism of some sort?  [You should have a teacher.  But there’s no ceremony, you just are.  I don’t even know if I am.]”  He sort of chuckled and said I have a beginner’s mind.  I actually think he enjoyed my questions.  So basic.  Probably things he takes for granted now.  What I was really excited about was the fact that Allyn was interested in creating a children’s Zen program and open to accepting my brood.  Amen!  I mean, Om?  Okay, I’ve gotta work on that.

After many more questions and slightly embarrassing disciplinary dealings with XG, I thanked Allyn and he sent me off with the book Zen Mind Beginner’s Mind.  He had a feeling I’d be back to return it.  I have a feeling I’ll be back, too.  I really like Allyn and his Zendo.  I like the simplicity of Zen, the near absence of statues and photos.  I like the cleanness of it.  There are more centers to visit still, but I can already tell this one is vibing with me.

Since steering my covered wagon away from Christianity, I must say, I’ve felt like a feather in the wind.  I don’t belong anywhere and I don’t know where I’ll end up.  But feathers in the wind are alluring.  They’re free.  They’re full of potential.  And when you find them, you say, “Oh, look!  A feather!”  So I’m confident that I will find a place where I can learn to fly.  Come to think of it, floating in the wind already feels a lot like flying.

From mine to yours,

Vanessa

p.s.  Please share this blog with other Bostonian Bu-curious.

children’s lesson: where the mountain meets the moon

Author and Somerville, Mass resident (woot!) Grace Lin graces us with an extraordinary story of adventure and magic, while providing classic Buddhist lessons for children.  Newbery Honor recipient Where the Mountain Meets the Moon is the tale of a little girl named Minli who leaves her poor village in China to find the immortal Old Man of the Moon and change her family’s fortune.

This is a terrific book for boys or girls.  Where the Mountain Meets the Moon captivated both my 6 and 8 year olds.  And I loved it, too!  I think it’s suitable for any age, but best for K-5 graders.  I read the book aloud to them, but both could have handled it on their own.  If you have young fluent readers, this is a great alternative to Judy Moody, as Minli never says “hate” or “stupid”, nor does she have any bratty temper tantrums.

If you’d like to connect a Buddhist lesson with a great story, here’s a wonderful opportunity.   Before reading this book, teach your BUBs about The Four Noble Truths.

  1. Life means suffering.
  2. The cause of suffering is attachment.
  3. The end of suffering is attainable.
  4. There is a path to the end of suffering.

Ask your children what they think this means.  Listen patiently for their answers.  Then help them correctly interpret the truths.

The first is pretty clear.  Life is synonymous with suffering.  Suffering is dis-ease, it’s imperfection, it’s worry.

The second truth tells us that attachment is the cause of suffering.  Be them relationships or objects or ideals, we hold on to these things so tightly that we become frustrated (we suffer) when we cannot control them, when we lose them or when they change.

The third noble truth gives us hope that we can end suffering through dispassion.  By letting go, we can find peace.

The fourth truth shows us the path to the end of suffering via an eight-fold path of balance and focus.  Some Buddhist practitioners believe that it takes many lifetimes to end a soul’s suffering.  Others, such as Zen Buddhists, believe that a person can achieve enlightenment during any given lifetime.

Talk through all of this with your kids.  Ask them what they’re attached to and how this makes them feel.  Remind them that it’s okay to love with all their hearts, but truly loving something or someone means letting go.   Ask them if there’s ever been a time in their lives when it was hard to let go of something or someone special.  Or if they have ever had a hard time letting go of a feeling.  Anger?  Worry?  Excitement?

Now start the book!

While reading to my kids, PG, my rising 2nd grader, surprised me when she interrupted midway through the book, “The king is doing the third noble thingy.  He’s ending his suffering by giving away his treasure.”   I was thrilled that the lesson stuck!  And she was able to apply it in context!  So, while reading, encourage your BUBs to listen carefully for opportunities to apply the noble truths.  If they miss something, put the book down and ask them if this part of the story reminds them of the lesson you taught them…  Buddha Magic!

From mine to yours,

Vanessa

p.s.

Please share this with your favorite BUB!  Call her up and say this, “Hi BUB, I think you might like this new blog called BUB.  Check it out!”